Color Your World (Or at Least your Walls) and Change Your Mood

Most of us have been spending more time at home lately, perhaps staring at those same walls and yearning for a different color, a new ambiance. Changing your mood may be as easy as painting your walls a new color. But which hues should you choose?

Whether you’re redesigning one room or your entire living space, there are ways to evoke specific emotions just by carefully selecting your wall color. By embracing the psychology of color, you can create a more lively living room, a creative kitchen, a calm and peaceful bedroom, or a studious-minded study. So go ahead, transform any room into your perfect vision.

Your choice of wall color can make an expansive room seem more intimate, or a too-small room appear a little larger. What atmosphere do you want to create?

We’ve gathered some enlightening information about how the wall colors in a room can affect your mood, your feelings, and even your actions.

 

What is Color Psychology?

Colors can affect our moods, including physical and emotional reactions. For instance, blue and green colors promote a relaxed, calm feeling, while yellows and orange colors can make us feel more energetic and productive.

Scientists, artists, and interior designers have been studying some form of color psychology for centuries. Long ago, some ancient Egyptian and Chinese cultures practiced light therapy (also called chromotherapy) using colors to heal ailments.

More than 350 years ago, Sir Isaac Newton, an English scientist, discovered all the visible colors when he passed pure, white light through a prism. In his groundbreaking research, he found that each color, on a single wavelength, couldn’t be separated. However, some color lights could be combined into new colors, such as red and yellow lights forming orange light.

Over the years, the knowledge gained from studying color psychology has helped drive advertising, marketing, and art. It has also changed interior design decisions, from offices to homes. Some color/mood beliefs have even made it everyday sayings, like “I have the blues” or “I’m green with envy.”

Colors Have Personalities

Can your feelings and behaviors become altered – calmed, or enlivened, peace-filled, or energized – just by the colors around you? Yes.

When you’re choosing the dominating color of your rooms, it’s a good idea to keep “color personalities” in mind, along with your goal for that room. Do you want a soothing space for your teething toddler or an invigorating, creativity-inspiring color for your art or crafts room? Do you work at home and want to help boost your productivity?

The saturation of color – how deep, how intense the hue is – can also influence its effect. For instance, a bright, canary-yellow wall will have a more cheery effect than a subdued, muted yellow. A deep red color may be perceived as more aggression-inspiring than a more subtle, welcoming pink.

When perusing colors, keep in mind there are two types of colors: warm and cool. Interior decorators often choose a pleasing balance of both within a room.

Color Temperatures

Pick up a color wheel from your favorite arts and crafts store, interior designer, or home improvement store. You can also find a color wheel online. This wheel shows primary, tertiary and other colors and their relationships with one another. The color wheel also shows warm and cool colors. It’s an important tool in picking wall colors and complementing decor colors for furnishings and accessories or less dominant walls.

Warm Colors

Colors can be warm or cool, or with undertones of warm or cool. Warm colors tend to make a room look cozier and inviting. They can give small rooms the impression of being smaller, or make bigger rooms more intimate. Warm colors are reminiscent of sunsets and the warmth of the sun. They can be reds, browns, orange-reds, tans, yellows, and yellows with green undertones.

Cool Colors

On the opposite side of the color wheel are cool colors and colors with cool undertones. On walls, these colors give more of a calm, peaceful, soothing feel to a room. While warm colors advance, cool colors recede into the background, so if you have a small bedroom, a cool wall color helps make it look roomier. However, cooler colors may not feel as comforting as warm colors. Cool colors include blues, blue-greens, purples and lavenders, colors you may see on an overcast, gray, or winter day. They’re ideal for sunrooms or other airy places in your home.

When deciding on colors, don’t forget about neutral colors like whites, grays, and blacks, and all the color ranges within. These colors can be either warm or cool depending on their undertones.

How to Choose the Right Color

Now that you have a little knowledge about color temperatures and how colors can change the mood of a room, it’s time to explore ways to change up your own space. Here are some popular colors and the effect they may have on your room, and room choices.

Blue

Blue colors are excellent choices for bedrooms. A calming, serene color that helps you relax, re-balance, and clear your mind after a stressful day, blue also helps lower blood pressure and steady your breathing. These are great aspects to help you fall asleep or unwind. You can warm the cool blue colors with warm-colored accents. Walls in calming hues of blues and greens also are great for lounging rooms, offices, dining rooms, and living rooms.

Pink

Pink is a more subdued hue of red. Pink walls help relieve anger and other negative feelings, bringing a positive, balanced, imaginative feeling to the room. Subtle pink is perfect for instilling joy in bedrooms, nurseries, playrooms, and creative workspaces.

Green

Green hues are also excellent choices for sleep rooms or offices. Green invokes both an aura of prosperity and relaxing restoration. Green hues coax mind-clearing, composing, restful feelings. Green also is a great choice for people who love the outdoors, giving a natural look.

White

Many people like the crisp, clean look of white walls and ceilings. White can open up the look of your room, making it appear more spacious and pure. White ceilings seem higher, too. White, which evokes purity, goodness, and innocence, doesn’t add or subtract energy from your atmosphere. Instead, it’s a neutral choice, providing a blank canvas of sorts to accentuate your space with the warm or cool colors of your choice.

Red

Some people consider red as a romantic and social color, equating it to red roses, Valentine’s Day, or that sultry red party dress. However, psychologically, red is also paired with aggression and hostility. It can raise your heart rate and blood pressure and is linked with being irritable.

Carefully consider which room you want to paint red. You may not want the color in your bedroom, as it won’t promote peace, relaxation, and tranquility. Instead, reserve it for rooms where you entertain and hold gatherings, or one wall of a library or another room. Low-light rooms with red walls do exude an elegant aura.

Purple, Lavender

Purple is not just for kings and queens anymore. This rich, dramatic color is traditionally known as the color of luxury and royalty, with undertones of romance, sophistication, and mystery. Purple colors can spark creativity on the walls of your art studio, craft space, or family room.

If you love purple and want to repaint your bedroom, consider a lighter, more relaxing, and calming hue of purple like lavender or lilac.

Orange

Orange walls ensure an aura of energy, excitement, and enthusiasm. Bring this color into rooms where you exercise and want stimulation. Orange may be too intense for kitchens (you don’t want to be stimulated into eating), living rooms, or bedrooms if you want to relax in those rooms.

Yellow

Brighten the look of your room and boost your mood with lively, invigorating yellow walls. This cheery color increases your energy and helps instill a happy, joyful feeling. It can stimulate mental and physical energy and makes a great addition to your kitchen while you’re getting ready for the day with that first cup of coffee. Soak up the look of sunlight and flowers for an uplifting aura. This color also looks fantastic in the bathroom, laundry room, and porch walls, anywhere a sunny look is welcomed.

Black

Want your room to feel bold and sophisticated, edgy yet cozy? Consider painting one or more walls a sleek black. Dark walls pair perfectly with rich, sumptuous surroundings for an imposing and dramatic yet comforting ambiance. Black is synonymous with strength, authority, formality, and power. It can, however, make your room overly dark or foreboding.

Gray

Some of the most on-trend interior wall colors are the many warm and cool shades of gray. Gray colors promote a timeless, practical look, perfectly neutral for adding your own special touches.

Gray walls may cancel out creative, energetic impulses, though. Many homeowners prefer having gray hues in common areas and bedrooms and balancing them with complementing, more vibrant colors on accessories or non-dominant walls.

Get Creative and Have Fun

Whether it’s your whole house or one room at a time, transform your space with a color that’s perfectly you. Using the color wheel and color swatches, get creative and try different combinations of colors in your room with a balance of warm and cool colors. Finding the best home decor color can bring a fresh look to your space.

Originally posted on Porch.com


The truth about online home shopping

The start of a home search for nearly everyone starts online…. Zillow.com, Trulia.com, realtor.com.  There are a ton of sites out there for people to view homes for sale, recently sold, or even get an estimate on what these sites think the value of a home is.  The problem is, this information can be widely inaccurate and this ultimately leads to disappointment & frustration for home shoppers & sellers alike.  Let me explain.

Not all homes for sale are syndicated on these public sites.

  • It is up to the seller to decide if they want their home listed on these public sites or not.  Therefore, all homes that are listed for sale on the real estate MLS ( multiple listing service) site are not necessarily shown for sale on the public sites.  Your dream property may not even coming up in your search, but it’s sitting right there on MLS.  To get a true picture of what is out there for sale, you’ll want to talk with a realtor.

Data is not refreshed in a timely manner.

  • The 3rd party sites aren’t always refreshed in a timely manner so what may still look like an active listing for sale on Zillow is actually under contract on MLS.  I’ve even had a buyer send me a house for sale on Zillow to get my opinion and when I looked at MLS, it was sold months ago.  You don’t want to fall in love with a house online to then see it’s not even for sale.

Data is not complete.

  • MLS has hundreds of fields that realtors can fill in to give a complete picture of what the home has.  The online public sites only have a fraction of that.  So if you have a specific requirement in a home, you may think it’s perfect from your search online, but once you actually see the home or your realtor does the digging for you, it turns out to be missing one of your requirements.

Online home value estimates are widely inaccurate.

  • These public sites are using an algorithm and do not take into account the true details of a house.  The public sites don’t know about improvements that have been made to the home and if information like the number of bedrooms or square footage is off, the online estimate will be off.  These sites also use comparable sales for their data points and what they think is a comp, may not be a comparable property when you look at the true factors of the houses.

Even with these points, I do still support buyers shopping online.  It is a good way to get a taste of the different types of homes & a general idea of what is out there.  Once a buyer has spent time searching online, the safest bet is to share what they found with a realtor and go look at the homes in person.  Pictures online can be hiding some important characteristics about the home and you can only get the true picture until you are on the property.

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If you have been poking around online on your own and you want to share with a REALTOR® what you have been looking at in Colorado, I’d love to help!  Please email me at beth@goodacreproperties.com or reach out via the contact information below:


Hottest Home Trends of 2019

With this post, I am not trying to pretend like I am a design expert, but being a REALTOR® and someone who is interested in “all things home”, I do read a lot of home articles, posts, and blogs.  Lately, I feel like one after another is about the hottest trends to expect for 2019 – from paint colors to interior design, furniture design, and overall home. If you have plans for redecorating or want to refresh some of your spaces, it can’t hurt to know what experts believe will be resonating in 2019.  I have gathered together some of the more valuable articles I have read and pulled out a few consistent points I am seeing across sources.

Predictions for what will be hot in 2019:

  • More bold, vivid, high-contrast patterns and more vibrant accent colors
  • Pantone declares Living Coral is the color of the year. What it conveys: Life-affirming, optimism, joy.
  • Earth tones: all versions of sand and earthy colors like ochre, burnt gold, and terracotta like Sherwin-Williams’ 2019 color Cavern Clay
  • Art Deco influence to become more prominent in the coming year
  • Ornate & textured walls and wallpaper
  • Antiques and handmade, custom pieces – return to handcrafted authenticity
  • Live Greenery and biophilia (the innate tendency in human beings to focus on life and lifelike process)
  • Innovative uses and mixing of metals 
  • Matte Black

If you have some time to read more for yourself, here are a few of the best articles I have read for 2019 predictions: 

All in all, I believe what is most important is that you make design decisions that resonate well with you & your family.  If you aren’t a fan of a certain style, don’t try to force it because some people say it is “in style.”  And lastly, I still stand by the importance of timeless design decisions for major renovations if you want to maximize the resale value of your home which I touch upon in my last blog post:  Home Renovation Projects that Boost Resale Value of Your Home.

Happy planning and decorating!

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If you or someone you know has any real estate needs within Colorado, I would love to help!  I support buyers and sellers primarily in the Denver-Boulder areas. Please reach out via the contact form below to start a conversation about how I can help you:

 

 


Home Renovation Projects that Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Many home buyers that are considering home renovation projects usually want to make sure they are investing in something that will raise home values and appeal to home buyers. Even if there are no plans to sell soon, it is wise to keep resale in mind for home renovation projects.  Prioritizing your spending into areas of the home that will help boost resale values is a smart approach.  Read more for tips on how to help with your planning:

  • Kitchens.  Nearly every buyer is pleased when they see a beautiful kitchen, even buyers that aren’t afraid of projects.  Kitchen remodels can be expensive so even if the rest of the house needs work, buyers are happy to see that one project checked off the list.  If you are planning any home project, starting with a kitchen update really should pay off in the end.   Overall make sure the layout is functional – does the flow work for cooking & entertaining?  Know that plenty of counterspace & storage is important to buyers and many will be pleased with an island in the kitchen as long as it doesn’t make the space too cramped.  New energy-efficient appliances will benefit you as a homeowner and look appealing to future buyers.  Finally, if you are going to update things like cabinets, countertops, the backsplash, and lighting try to stay with design decisions that are timeless.  Any unique features that only appeal to a certain type of audience will narrow the pool of buyers that appreciate the work put into the kitchen.
  • Bathrooms.  After the kitchen is done, move onto the bathrooms.  Same rule applies with keeping the updates appealing to a broad audience.  You want to create an attractive space that has a clean and updated feel.   You can still have fun with your updates – maybe consider an accent wall behind the vanity or toilet or new, modern mirrors & lighting.  Keep in mind that many buyers still want at least one tub in their home so don’t plan to get rid of all bathtubs in your house, no matter how trendy those stand-alone showers are.
  • Energy efficiency.  The next item that will pay off for both you as a homeowner & for resale is how efficient the home is.  Check the age of the furnace or boiler, hot water heater, & A/C units – consider updating with new models that work more efficiently. Leaky doors and windows affect your heating and cooling bills and is something buyers will notice.  If you don’t want to replace your windows & doors, you can update weather-stripping or reseal the windows to see if that helps.  If you have poor insulation in the house, you can improve the quality of the insulation.
  • Exterior.  First impression makes a difference so investing in exterior updates will be beneficial as well.  Consider an exterior paint refresh, especially if you have chipping or fading paint. If you are looking for a change, but don’t want to repaint the whole house, choose a fresh new color for the front door.  For an affordable update that makes a big difference, swap out any exterior lights that may not be working or are outdated and replace with a fresh, modern look.  Lastly, investing in your yard and garden will help you better enjoy your home & have buyers see that you not only have a great house, but a great property.  Be careful with adding unique additions that may turn away future buyers such as an elaborate water feature.  A koi pond, for example, may look beautiful to some, but to others it may just look like a lot of work or even a dangerous hazard to a buyer like a family with young children.
  • Look at your floors.  If you have carpet, tiling, or wood floors that have seen better days, investing in an upgrade or refresh for the floors will be a smart decision. Flooring can really stand out — making the whole house feel clean & inviting or put off the opposite effect if the floors are in bad shape.   Focus on what you can afford – making sure to at least to update the flooring in the rooms you renovate (such as the kitchen & bathrooms) and expect to have to price the house accordingly if the floors in other areas of the home really need work.

If resale value is a major concern of yours, talking to a local REALTOR® to get their advice before starting the project can be very beneficial.  If you are in the Boulder/Denver area, I would love to help!  Please reach out via the contact information below or email me at beth@goodacreproperties.com.